Sunday Salon- January 7, 2018

Here’s some of what I’ve been reading on the Internet this week:

-Feministing has a great recap of 2017 Feminist Writing on the Internet.

-You couldn’t make this Brontë Society Drama up…

-This Jezebel article: There’s Nothing More Ordinary Than Abuse, made me cry. It’s a profound piece of writing that will stay with me for a long time to come.

-Smithsonian takes a fascinating look Inside the Story of America’s 19th-Century Opiate Addiction.

-Shondaland explains The Mathematical Reality of Misogyny in the wake of the #MeToo Movement.

-The best thing about these frigid temperatures here in the US, is that it is the perfect excuse to curl up with a good book. Here are 11 Unputdownable Books To Help Get You Through The Rest Of Winter via Bustle.

 

What have you been reading on the Internet lately?

2 thoughts on “Sunday Salon- January 7, 2018

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  1. The Bronte Society thing is really crazy. Personally I’m not a huge Cole fan (or I haven’t been in the past: a lot of this drama spurred me to learn more about her!) but I have no problem with her doing this.

    I think that Holland’s initial post came off as incredibly sexist. He’s since denied it – he likes the Brontes and they were women so he can’t be sexist! Just look at how he identified Cole as a “supermodel” (even though she stopped modeling 4-5 years ago). He completely ignores the fact that she’s also a Cambridge graduate, and the founder of impossible.com, a company that uses technology to solve social and environmental problems, the co-owner of Claire de Rouen books in London, an actress, a filmmaker http://www.lilycole.com/ and a writer: http://www.lilycole.com/words/. To identify her only by a career venture that she pursued in her teens and early 20’s is dismissive of all of that.

    In fact, it’s for reasons like this Emily Bronte didn’t want to publish her work at all and that all three Bronte sisters wrote under pseudonyms. They knew that their gender would overshadow their work and influence public perception if it were commonly known. The fact that a Bronte scholar can’t see the parallel is pretty incredible!

    Liked by 1 person

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